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South Carolina Teen Finds The Answers with DCH Neurosurgeon

LiveWell is a publication that is created by Doctors Community Hospital to help educate the residents of Prince George’s County about relevant health topics (which are written for the layperson) as well as services offered at the hospital. Roughly 220,000 copies are distributed each printing. The publication highlights upcoming hospital-sponsored events and free support groups.

The general idea is that by providing patients with important health information they will be proactive in the care they receive and be able to live healthier, longer lives. In the Fall 2009 issue, Dr. Fraser Henderson and patient, Mackenzie Mathis, were featured in the cover story. The article “Desperate for Answers” creates a compelling story—giving both the patient and treating physician perspectives in a case that baffled many physicians and robbed a 17-year-old young woman of her vitality and passion for dance. After being correctly diagnosed and treated through corrective surgery performed at Doctors Community Hospital, the patient is living life to the fullest once again and is example of not only the cutting-edge health services provided at Doctors Community Hospital, but also the experienced physicians who are affiliated with the hospital.

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